Knowledge

How to Work From Home When You Have Kids

With schools closing, many parents switching to working from home, and social isolation diminishing child-care options, juggling kids and work is becoming a new reality for many individuals.

For almost six years, I’ve worked from home—nearly as long as I’ve been a parent. I’ve worked through my daughter’s day care abruptly closing, both of my girls being sick for a week with hand-foot-and-mouth disease, and hundreds of snow days and sick days with one or both of them at home throughout that time.

These past few months have felt like both a marathon and a sprint. The days can seem lengthy at times, but in order to keep up with the kids, I’ve had to work in short bursts.

Working with kids at home isn’t ideal, but I’ve devised a few strategies that have helped me get through it. In the next weeks, I’ll be using them at home with both my preschooler and first-grader. For more ideas, see our past posts on staying sane when working from home with kids.

Make a daily agenda for yourself.

You’re not likely to become an expert homeschooler. After all, you’re juggling two jobs at once! (After all, there’s a reason you didn’t decide to homeschool in the first place.) Giving your family a list of activities, on the other hand, provides the day direction and speed, and you won’t be left wondering what to do next with your little monsters. I try to stick to my children’s school schedules (and if your child’s school is closed, you may have already been given study topics to focus on). For my 4- and 6-year-olds, this usually comprises some reading, drawing, time management, a walk outside, and lunch. Make a daily agenda for yourself.

You’re not likely to become an expert homeschooler. After all, you’re juggling two jobs at once! (After all, there’s a reason you didn’t decide to homeschool in the first place.) Giving your family a list of activities, on the other hand, provides the day direction and speed, and you won’t be left wondering what to do next with your little monsters. I try to stick to my children’s school schedules (and if your child’s school is closed, you may have already been given study topics to focus on). For my 4- and 6-year-olds, this usually comprises some reading, drawing, time management, a walk outside, and lunch.

It’s similar to what they do at my daughter’s preschool, but it doesn’t have to be so difficult. For me, a simple list with expected deadlines has proven to be really useful. (Check out this post for more ideas on how to arrange a school day at home.)

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